The Proper Putting Stance

The Proper Putting StanceGet Your Head Over the Ball

If you have been missing a lot of putts lately, odds are you do not have a proper stance when putting. The stance for a normal golf shot and a putt are much different. The grip is still the same, however, with putting you want your body to be much closer to the ball.

When putting, you should line your body much closer to the ball. The club head should be flat on the ground and square towards the marking point. An easy way to tell if you have the proper stance is to line up for a putt and drop a golf ball directly from the spot between your eyes. The ball you drop should land on top of the ball you are going to putt. From this angle you are less likely to make judgment errors. You can see the back of the ball perfectly.

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Reading the Green

Reading the green isn’t as difficult as it may appear, and yet very few amateur golfers read the greens. It is not only for professionals. If you want to improve your handicap, it starts on the putting green. I am sure every one of you has missed a putt because you misread the slope of the green. Maybe you should have hit the putt 3 ball lengths outside the cup instead of 2. We all make mistakes. The following Easy Golf Tip will give you examples how to properly read the green.

A very simple analogy to improve your green reading skills is to pretend you are dumping a bucket of water on the green. In order to find the slope of the green, just imagine which way the water would flow.

Once you determine the slope of the green, pick the line of your putt. Set the club square to the marking point, not the cup. Keep your feet perpendicular to the club face. You want to pretend you are hitting a straight putt to your marking point. It is important to treat all putts as straight putts.

Once you have your marking point and are set to hit the ball, find a closer marking point on the green about 2-3 feet in front of you. This will help minimize error over hitting a long distance putt.

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Add More Distance to Your Driver by Decreasing Swing Speed

The first thing anyone asks when playing golf is How far can you hit?  In today’s world of golf it seems like power and distance prevails over accuracy. You see long ball hitting contests on TV and announcers only talk about how far Tiger Woods can hit the ball. So you’re tired of telling everyone you can only hit the ball 200 yards. It’s understandable that you want to improve your distance off the tee, after all, the tee shot is the first shot you take and it’s one that everyone will notice.

Contrary to popular physics laws, increased swing speed does not equal increased distance. When I learned how to play, I always followed Newton’s 2nd Law of Physics: acceleration x mass = force. It took me years to realize that the laws of physics don’t apply to golf. Tip number 1 to improving distance off the tee with your driver is to decrease swing speed.

I first want to clarify that when I say decrease swing speed, I mean decrease the take away and the follow through. With a slower swing you leave less room for error because the club is not trying to play catch up with the rest of your body.

Professional golfers average a downward swing speed of over 100 mph, with most at around 110 mph. Tiger Woods swings the club 125 mph. Just because professionals do it, does not mean the average golfer should. They are professionals for a reason.

The typical golfer should maintain a club head speed of just below 100 mph. If you are unsure of your swing speed, you can usually go to a local pro shop and have it measured in a simulator.

After taking a slow back swing and you have the club set at the peak position, it is recommended that you swing the club faster than the backswing, just don’t try to kill the ball. Some of the common problems associated with increased swing speed are:

  • Snapping the wrists
  • Anger

In conclusion, the number 1 Easy Golf Tip for increasing distance off the tee is to slow down your swing speed. I know it sounds ridiculous because it defies the laws of physics, but you have to trust the plan. Practice as often as you can with slowing the swing down. Take 2-3 practice swings before stepping up to the ball. Repeat the exact practice swing on the ball. Don’t try to kill the ball, it didn’t do anything to you.

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Add More Distance to Your Driver by Rotating Your Hips More



A common misconception in golf is that power comes from the hands or swing speed. This could not be firth from the truth. The following Easy Golf Tip will help you improve your distance with the driver by rotating your body.

Torque is defined as a turning or twisted force. This is what we want the body to do in a proper golf swing. You can probably notice that elderly golfers can not rotate their body as much as a younger golfer. This directly results in a decrease in power and distance. All the power from your swing comes from your legs, not the arms. By creating more torque, you will create more power.

I am going to use the following picture as a guide on how to build the perfect rotation for your swing.

Golf Tips to Improve Your Driving Accuracy and Distance

Golf Tips to Improve Your Driving Accuracy and Distance

Notice in step one the right shoulder is pointed straight down at the target. The head is down and the club is almost parallel to the target. You want to see your belt buckle pointed away from the target during your rotation.

In step two you will notice the hips starting to rotate back towards the target. The head remains behind the ball as the hips rotate. Staying behind the ball will deliver more power upon contact.

In step three, the belt buckle is almost square to the ball.

Step four is the most important part of the rotation process, this is called the follow through. Notice the belt buckle pointing directly at the target. This is crucial for the follow through. There are two ways to practice the follow through:

  • Line up to the ball without a club and take your stance. Grab your right hip bone with your left hand. Now take a swinging motion and grab your right hip a pull it towards your target until the belt buckle faces the target. Practicing this will help your body remember to fully rotate towards the target in the follow through.
  • Another example to practice this is to take your stance at a ball and put your hands together (palm to palm) where you would normally hold the club. Take a back swing and follow through. At the end of the follow through, pretend you are going to shake someone’s hand with your right hand (for right handed golfers). You want to reach out and extend your right arm on the follow through.

For more tips on how to improve your driving accuracy or distance, check more postings here.

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How to Hit a Draw

golf tips

golf tips

One of the most common questions an amateur golfer might have is, how do you hit a high draw with your fairway irons? Beginners are generally known for slicing the ball and hitting fades because they aren’t keeping their wrists straight in the take back, thus opening the club face on impact. To hit a high draw, it is much easier than it might sound. The following Easy Golf Tip will teach you an easy way to hit a draw.

The tip below is the easiest way for a beginner golfer to hit a draw. The benefit of hitting a draw is the added distance. The first step is to line up as if you are hitting a normal straight shot. Make sure to keep the club head square to the ball and the target. The second step is to aim your feet just right of the target a couple of degrees, probably 5-10 degrees. By aiming your feet to the right of the flag and keeping the club head square to the ball, you are closing your stance. This will put a draw on the ball.

Take a normal back swing and be sure to keep your head down. Rotate your body and follow through with the swing. If done properly, your ball with have a right to left draw while in flight.

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Hitting a Punch Shot

So you’ve found your ball stuck behind a tree in the woods. You have a small clearing but a large branch is keeping you from hitting your normal shot. You need a punch shot. The perfect punch shot is a low trajectory shot that will allow you to gain maximum distance by keeping the ball low to the ground. In today’s Golf Tip we will discuss how to hit a proper punch shot.

When hitting a punch shot you want to select a low lofted club like a 4 or 5 iron to help minimize the height of the ball once you hit it. To his a punch shot you will need to place the ball in the back of your stance. You will want to choke down on the grip just a little bit so the club is not fully extended from your hands.

When attempting a punch shot it is best to use a hand position that is known as the forward press. This simply means your hands are pressed forward in front of the ball. You will want to take a half to three-quarters swing and a half to three-quarters follow through after striking the ball.

Punch shots are ideal in shallow rough and pine straw from the woods. Do not attempt a punch shot from the deep rough because it is harder to control and likely you will chunk it.

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