The Proper Putting Stance

The Proper Putting StanceGet Your Head Over the Ball

If you have been missing a lot of putts lately, odds are you do not have a proper stance when putting. The stance for a normal golf shot and a putt are much different. The grip is still the same, however, with putting you want your body to be much closer to the ball.

When putting, you should line your body much closer to the ball. The club head should be flat on the ground and square towards the marking point. An easy way to tell if you have the proper stance is to line up for a putt and drop a golf ball directly from the spot between your eyes. The ball you drop should land on top of the ball you are going to putt. From this angle you are less likely to make judgment errors. You can see the back of the ball perfectly.

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You Have to Feel the Putt

Has anyone ever told you that you have great touch? Well if you haven’t heard it  that’s ok. After all, you are here to learn right? The following Easy Golf Tip will teach you a practice tool that will give you the touch you need to make the ball fall into the cup.

Line up in the middle of the practice green for a long putt. By long putt, I mean 25 ft at least. Face your putt to the fringe of the green. Hit your first putt so that it goes off the green and a foot or two into the fringe. Hit your second putt so it falls a foot or two short of the fringe line. Now, hit your third putt so it lands somewhere between the first and second ball.

Once you get your third ball in the middle of the first two, hit about 3 more putts that all fall within the first and second ball. You should have the stroke down. Now to really get the feel for the putt, you must close your eyes for the next shot. Use the same exact putting swing you used for the previous few balls. Nothing will change except your eyes being closed.

The goal is to keep hitting balls that land between the first and second one while keeping your eyes closed. This will help you get that all important touch when approaching a normal putt.

If you look at any professional basketball player, they can all hit free throws with their eyes closed. It is the same motion and the have a feel for where the hoop is. The same concept applies in golf.

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Improve the Speed of your Putts

Nothing in putting is worse than leaving the ball short. It’s an awful feeling knowing that no matter what would have happened, you’re ball wouldn’t have made it to the hole, even on the perfect line. So how do you gage the right speed of a putt? How do you practice this? In the following Easy Golf Tip, I will cover a simple way to judge the speed of a putt, and how you can practice until you are a pro.

I am sure you have noticed that if you play golf in the morning the grass might be shiny and if you play in the afternoon the grass might look dull. If you see shiny grass, this means you will be putting with the grain. Putting with the grain will create a quicker ball speed, thus you need to lay back a little on the putt. If you see dull grass when putting, this means your ball is moving against the grain. Putting against the grain means your ball will move slower and you will need to putt with a bit more force.

I know a great tool used to practice judging the speed of a putt. You first need to lineup for a putt about 4 ft away. Lay your driver on the green directly in front of the hole so the shaft of the driver is blocking the way in. Make sure the shaft is on the ground and not elevated. Take aim at the hole and hit your 4 ft putt. If you hit the putt too lightly, the ball will either not reach the shaft of the driver or it will hit the shaft and stop rolling. If you putt the ball too hard, the ball will hit the shaft and go right over the hole and keep rolling. The perfect putt will hit the shaft, hop over it and fall right into the cup. The perfect speed of a putt will want to stop about a foot past the hole.

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Reading the Green

Reading the green isn’t as difficult as it may appear, and yet very few amateur golfers read the greens. It is not only for professionals. If you want to improve your handicap, it starts on the putting green. I am sure every one of you has missed a putt because you misread the slope of the green. Maybe you should have hit the putt 3 ball lengths outside the cup instead of 2. We all make mistakes. The following Easy Golf Tip will give you examples how to properly read the green.

A very simple analogy to improve your green reading skills is to pretend you are dumping a bucket of water on the green. In order to find the slope of the green, just imagine which way the water would flow.

Once you determine the slope of the green, pick the line of your putt. Set the club square to the marking point, not the cup. Keep your feet perpendicular to the club face. You want to pretend you are hitting a straight putt to your marking point. It is important to treat all putts as straight putts.

Once you have your marking point and are set to hit the ball, find a closer marking point on the green about 2-3 feet in front of you. This will help minimize error over hitting a long distance putt.

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Golf Tips to Improve Your Putting Accuracy

This portion of Easy Golf Tips is to provide you with some simple, yet effective golf tips that will improve your putting accuracy and lower putts per hole. Have you ever heard the saying “Drive for show, Putt for Dough”?. This statement couldn’t be more true. You can drive the ball 300 yards all day, but if yuo can’t make a putt you will never improve your score. The best players in the world are all the best putters in the world.

By using the tips, you can not only improve the way you read the green, but you can also practice getting that special feel and touch that so many players have. To lower your handicap, you must first do so by improving your putting skills.

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Add More Distance to Your Driver by Decreasing Swing Speed

The first thing anyone asks when playing golf is How far can you hit?  In today’s world of golf it seems like power and distance prevails over accuracy. You see long ball hitting contests on TV and announcers only talk about how far Tiger Woods can hit the ball. So you’re tired of telling everyone you can only hit the ball 200 yards. It’s understandable that you want to improve your distance off the tee, after all, the tee shot is the first shot you take and it’s one that everyone will notice.

Contrary to popular physics laws, increased swing speed does not equal increased distance. When I learned how to play, I always followed Newton’s 2nd Law of Physics: acceleration x mass = force. It took me years to realize that the laws of physics don’t apply to golf. Tip number 1 to improving distance off the tee with your driver is to decrease swing speed.

I first want to clarify that when I say decrease swing speed, I mean decrease the take away and the follow through. With a slower swing you leave less room for error because the club is not trying to play catch up with the rest of your body.

Professional golfers average a downward swing speed of over 100 mph, with most at around 110 mph. Tiger Woods swings the club 125 mph. Just because professionals do it, does not mean the average golfer should. They are professionals for a reason.

The typical golfer should maintain a club head speed of just below 100 mph. If you are unsure of your swing speed, you can usually go to a local pro shop and have it measured in a simulator.

After taking a slow back swing and you have the club set at the peak position, it is recommended that you swing the club faster than the backswing, just don’t try to kill the ball. Some of the common problems associated with increased swing speed are:

  • Snapping the wrists
  • Anger

In conclusion, the number 1 Easy Golf Tip for increasing distance off the tee is to slow down your swing speed. I know it sounds ridiculous because it defies the laws of physics, but you have to trust the plan. Practice as often as you can with slowing the swing down. Take 2-3 practice swings before stepping up to the ball. Repeat the exact practice swing on the ball. Don’t try to kill the ball, it didn’t do anything to you.

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How to Hit a Draw

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One of the most common questions an amateur golfer might have is, how do you hit a high draw with your fairway irons? Beginners are generally known for slicing the ball and hitting fades because they aren’t keeping their wrists straight in the take back, thus opening the club face on impact. To hit a high draw, it is much easier than it might sound. The following Easy Golf Tip will teach you an easy way to hit a draw.

The tip below is the easiest way for a beginner golfer to hit a draw. The benefit of hitting a draw is the added distance. The first step is to line up as if you are hitting a normal straight shot. Make sure to keep the club head square to the ball and the target. The second step is to aim your feet just right of the target a couple of degrees, probably 5-10 degrees. By aiming your feet to the right of the flag and keeping the club head square to the ball, you are closing your stance. This will put a draw on the ball.

Take a normal back swing and be sure to keep your head down. Rotate your body and follow through with the swing. If done properly, your ball with have a right to left draw while in flight.

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Hitting a Punch Shot

So you’ve found your ball stuck behind a tree in the woods. You have a small clearing but a large branch is keeping you from hitting your normal shot. You need a punch shot. The perfect punch shot is a low trajectory shot that will allow you to gain maximum distance by keeping the ball low to the ground. In today’s Golf Tip we will discuss how to hit a proper punch shot.

When hitting a punch shot you want to select a low lofted club like a 4 or 5 iron to help minimize the height of the ball once you hit it. To his a punch shot you will need to place the ball in the back of your stance. You will want to choke down on the grip just a little bit so the club is not fully extended from your hands.

When attempting a punch shot it is best to use a hand position that is known as the forward press. This simply means your hands are pressed forward in front of the ball. You will want to take a half to three-quarters swing and a half to three-quarters follow through after striking the ball.

Punch shots are ideal in shallow rough and pine straw from the woods. Do not attempt a punch shot from the deep rough because it is harder to control and likely you will chunk it.

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